Livermore Valley Repeaters
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Repeater system resources in and around the Livermore Valley area which may be of use and interest to LARK members.  This list is not meant to be a complete list of all available repeaters, and this list might not always be up to date.

Output

Call

PL

 

Use

Coverage Area

51.820-

WR6VHF

127.3

 

General

Central California

145.350-

AB6CR

100

 

RACES

Tri-Valley, San Joaquin Valley & Sierra Foothills

145.210-

WA6SEK

100

NFM

General

Tri-Valley, San Joaquin Valley

145.430-

KO6PW

100

 

RACES ONLY

Livermore, Pleasanton

146.655-

AB6CR

100

 

RACES

San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento to Modesto

146.775-

WA6YHJ

100

 

RACES ONLY

Livermore, Pleasanton

147.045+

W6SRR

94.8

NFM

General

Tri-Valley, South Bay  (IRLP Node 3399)

147.060+

W6CX

100

 

RACES

Central California

147.120+

AD6KV

100

 

RACES

Livermore, Pleasanton, Dublin

223.980-

W6YOP

85.4

 

General

East Bay Area and beyond

224.600-

KB6ABM

157.7

 

General

Condor Connection Linked System

224.740-

KO6PW

100

 

RACES

Tri-Valley

224.780-

W6CX

77

 

RACES

Central California

224.880-

K6LRG

94.8

 

General

Livermore, Pleasanton, Dublin

441.325+

W6CX

100

 

RACES

Central California (very very low power)

442.075+

K6LNK

103.5

 

General

CARLA system

442.625+

W6SRR

94.8

 

General

Tri-Valley, South Bay Area

444.125+

K7FED

100

 

General

Tri-Valley  I:3319 E:6778

927.1875-

W6SRR

94.8

 

General

Tri-Valley, South Bay Area (rx 902.1875)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Packet

 

 

 

 

 

144.350

WA6ODP-3 WA6ODP-1

 

 

Digipeter
PBBS

Tri-Valley;  Installed for RACES & ARES
     Open for all to use.  Primary LARK PBBS

 

WA6ODP-7

 

 

KA-Node

 

The repeaters in the preceding list are available for general use unless marked as "RACES Only." In the event of an emergency they will be used for Emergency and Priority EOC traffic. Health and Welfare traffic will be available on other systems.  Repeaters listed as NFM operate in Narrow FM mode.  If your radio can be set for NFM, please use this mode.  If not, please make sure you don't overdeviate, by not speaking too loudly or moving the microphone away from your mouth.

PaperLine

D-STAR Digital Voice frequencies.
Programming a D-STAR, Digital Voice radio isn't an easy process, and all of the features are making radios more complex.  It is highly recommended that you contact someone to help you program your radio.  There are several LARK members with D-STAR radios at this time.  Please contact any one of us for help.
Note:  Digital Voice simplex frequencies are not currently specifically allocated in any band plan, but are in appropriate band areas and have been selected with good Amateur practice in mind.  These simplex frequencies have been suggested throughout the U. S.  The frequencies are subject to change.

 145.670 MHz

digital voice calling and GPS position reporting

 145.600 MHz

non-calling digital voice contacts (ragchew).

1294.300 MHz

digital voice calling

For a complete list of D-Star repeaters, see:
http://www.dstarusers.org/

TRBO Digital Voice frequencies.
There is an expansive TRBO repeater system available in the valley.  Information and frequencies can be found here:  https://ncdcc.net/Digital_Systems.html

LARK AD6KV, 147.12 Repeater Coverage information

The following RF Plot maps were produced using the main repeater location and the remote receiver location.  The green area indicates areas that usually have HT coverage, the blue area usually requires a mobile type radio and larger antenna, and the gray areas require even larger antennas.  These maps are assuming that the user isn't hiding behind or inside of any buildings or other RF obstructing objects.  The maps are approximate, so your actual results will be slightly different, but should be relatively close.  Various labeled dots on the map are points of interest to the map creator.  The numbered dots leading to the southeast are the mile markers on The Mines Rd.

The LARK Repeater Coverage Map shows the true coverage of the repeater.  This is the area where the repeater can be heard and therefore is the true coverage of the repeater.
LARK Repeater Coverage Map
In addition, the LARK repeater has a remote receiver (operation described below).  The areas shown in this map can be heard by the repeater, but users in these areas might not be able hear the repeater.  A combination of BOTH maps is required to determine actual usable areas of the repeater (not available).  The remote receiver is a receive-only site and  acts as "listening-only" base station that receive the lower power signals of mobiles and portables, and relays the received signal to the actual repeater.
LARK Remote Receiver Coverage Map

If you look just at the repeater coverage map, the coverage isn't that great. When you look at the coverage of the remote receiver, it's easy to see that it is much better. (Please don't even ask why the repeater isn't at the hill site.  It has to do with sharing the frequency with other repeaters.)  Since both sites have receivers, but only the repeater site in Livermore has the transmitter, the actual coverage gets a bit odd.

The LARK repeater is located at VMC in Livermore.  When it was placed there it was immediately noticed that many users in Pleasanton were having difficulties reaching the repeater, so a remote receiver and voting system was added to the repeater.  Without a Voter is how most repeater systems operate.  In this case, what is heard by the repeater antenna is what is transmitted by the repeater antenna.
 
The Voter system adds a second receiver, a Remote Receiver on Pleasanton Ridge and a Voter at VMC.  When the Pleasanton Ridge receiver receives a signal, it is sent to VMC via an RF link.  This Link signal is received at VMC then sent to the Voter.  At the same time, most likely the same signal is being received at VMC by the main repeater receiver, and this signal is also being sent to the Voter.  The Voter is obviously where the magic happens.
 
The Voter compares both signals, and sends the best one to the main repeater transmitter, and this best signal is what we hear from the repeater.  It is also possible that the main receiver at VMC does not hear the originating signal, or the remote receiver does not hear the originating signal, and the Voter takes care of this, and the only received signal is transmitted. 

If the area is in the Green on EITHER map, an HT is all that is normally required for the repeater to hear you.  For you to hear the repeater with your HT, you should be in the Green area OF THE REPEATER COVERAGE PLOT.

PaperLine
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Last Updated: 03/12/17